Pre-College Programs

The focus of the Pre-College Program is “Awareness and Retention.” AISES engages in a multitude of programs and events that aim to ensure students are given exposure to first-rate science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) programs and events. These experiences and opportunities support students in discovering, pursuing, and sustaining their interest in STEM as they prepare for their college careers and beyond.

The Pre-College Program supports early childhood through high school education and students in STEM studies through teacher training, regional science bowls, science fairs, leadership development, mentorship, scholarships, internships and other programming designed to support students and their families.

Pre-College Programs

Energy Challenge

The office of the Assistant Secretary of Indian Affairs (AS-IA),  Indian Energy and Economic Development (IEED), Division of Energy and Mineral Development (DEMD) has partnered with AISES to develop the first ever national Energy Challenge (EC or Challenge) for American Indian/Alaskan Native  youth in grades 9-12.  The EC is an energy-specific science fair designed to engage and encourage high school students to participate in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education through a creative, hands-on, problem solving and engineering process in an environment similar to a science fair.  This 2015-16 Energy Challenge has two phases, with Phase 1 occurring over the Fall Semester (defined as September - December 2015) and Phase 2 occurring in the Spring semester (defined as January – March 2016).  High school students may compete as individuals, or as teams consisting of up to 3 students.  All students/teams must have an adult sponsor.  The sponsor can be either a parent, teacher, or mentor. 

Phase 1 – Research and Design:  Students will:

  1. Identify an energy-related problem that directly affects the individual, team, or their community.
  2. Assess the problem and identify possible solutions.
  3. Research and develop a demonstrable solution.
  4. Present a solution, with a budget of up to $2000, to build and implement their solution.

The top 5 winning students/teams, and one chaperone per project, will be awarded travel scholarships to attend the AISES 2015 National Conference on November 19-21, 2015, being held in Phoenix Arizona, where they will present their projects during the Pre-College Research Poster Competition.

Phase 2 – Build and Implement:  During this phase, the top 5 projects’ students must describe the product, solution, and results.  They will:

  1. Build project/ demonstration prototype, with a budget not to exceed $2,000.
  2. Communicate experience in building and solution implementation process.
  3. Present solution results.

Students are required to submit a PowerPoint presentation with embedded or linked videos and pictures as a supplement to their written narrative.

Eligibility 
Eligible students are American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) high school students in 9th, 10th, 11th or 12th grade.  Teams (up to 3 students) must have at least one AI/AN high school student fully participating in all team activities.  Each participant (whether an individual or team) must have one adult sponsor.  The sponsor can be either a parent, teacher, or mentor.  Students must be AISES members.  Pre-college students can currently join AISES for free during our membership drive which ends on November 19, 2015.  http://www.aises.org/membership

How to Participate

All participants must apply and upload all required documents via AISES’ online science fair platform.   Students will be required to submit the following via the online platform for Phase 1:

  1. Basic demographic information including legal name, contact information, grade, school attending, school contact, and tribal affiliation.
  2. Each application must have an Adult Sponsor listed, who will be the designated recipient of project funding if they advance to Phase 2.
  3. Documentation of their EC problem and solution using the engineering design.  Students will be required to maintain an engineering design notebook for their project, through both Phases 1 and 2.  This will be uploaded as an electronic document or pdf. 
  4. During Phase 1, they will submit a Design Plan, in the form of a PowerPoint Slideshow (up to 25 slides), that documents the students’ approach and efforts right up to the prototype building stage.  This plan shall address and include the following:
    1. Identification of the Problem – a written situation/statement of the problem describing the need that the students will be addressing with their design.
    2. Research Conducted – Document the research done that influenced the students’ design.  Student generated notes, observations, and other relevant information may be included.  This section must also include at least three of any of the following, in proper format:
      1. Articles
      2. Books
      3. Websites
      4. Surveys
      5. Scientific Periodicals and Publications
    3. Requirements and Constraints - Students should list and describe the criteria, constraints and priorities associated with the problem. on this page. The best criteria and constraints are usually quantitative. For instance, “can lift at least 200 grams” is a clearly criterion than “lifts a weight.”  These can also be determined by the needs of potential users of the design.
    4. Brainstormed Solutions and Developmental Design Sketches – at least three potential designs/ideas that were considered.  Students should include drawings with labels, measurements, and other useful details for viewers.
    5. Final Technical Drawing of the Selected Solution – this must be a multi-view drawing (on paper – scanned as a pdf – or in computer).  Students should include drawings with labels, measurements, and other useful details for viewers.
    6. Budget - an itemized list of supplies and associated project costs, not to exceed $2,000, needed for building the prototype (which must be small enough for standard shipping to Washington, DC - which is a constraint).
    7. Implementation Plan and Timeline for Building the Prototype.
  5. Project Abstract

Application Timeline and Link to Online Platform
The online application system will open no later than Thursday, September 24, 2015 and will close on Friday, October 23, 2015.   Students may access the application platform at: 

https://aisesvsef.starsscholarshipsonline.com/stars/default.aspx 

Judging and Award

AISES will review all applications for eligibility and completeness.  Eligible and complete projects will be judged by volunteers from the U.S. Department of Energy Laboratories including NREL, Sandia, Argonne, LLNL, other DOE laboratories, and other STEM professionals.  This judging committee will select the top 5 projects for Phase 2. In Phase 2, the DEMD will judge the projects.

For Phase I, a judging committee will select the top 5 projects for Phase 2. The judges will utilize the following scoring criteria to assign each project a score of up to 100 total points:

  • Students communicate energy problem and solution (up to 25 points)
  • Energy solution is measurable and demonstrable (up to 25 points)
  • Budget and plan for implementation is comprehensive and concise (up to 25 points)
  • Solution creativity (up to 25 points)

Each of the top 5 awarded projects will receive up to $2,000 for Phase 2.  They will also receive travel scholarships to attend the 2015 AISES National Conference in Phoenix, AZ, November 19-21, 2015, including conference registration fees.  Note:  The top 5 projects must attend the National Conference to advance to Phase 2.  AISES will disburse design awards to all designated Adult Sponsors no later than December 15, 2015.

In Phase 2, completed projects will be judged by a team of judges drawn from DEMD staffers.  They will make the final Grand Award selection from among the top 5 finalists. Teams will be notified of results no later than March 7, 2015.

Final projects will be evaluated by the judges using the following Phase 2 scoring criteria. Projects can receive up to 100 total points:

  • Successful construction and implementation (up to 30 points)
  • Solution data gathering and analysis (up to 35 points)
  • Presentation of results (up to 35 points)

Grand Prize Award:  No later than March 7, 2016, AISES will notify the Grand Award winner of the prize, and will coordinate travel to Washington, D.C., where the student will present their final design and results to the Assistant Secretary of Indian Affairs.  The finalist will also have two days to tour the nation’s capital and various sights and attractions.  The Grand Award winner will have all of their travel expenses covered and also those for their accompanying chaperone.  This is tentatively scheduled to take place the week of April 4-8, 2016.

FORMS and RESOURCES

Competition Rules  

Project Registration and Contact Information  (required)

Media and Liability Release (required) 

Abstract Guidelines and Samples 

Engineering Design Notebook and Instructions – Oregon Department of Education

http://www.ode.state.or.us/wma/teachlearn/testing/scoring/guides/2011-12/science_engdesign_notebooktemplate_hs.pdf

http://www.ode.state.or.us/wma/teachlearn/testing/scoring/guides/2011-12/science_engdesign_notebooktemplate_instructions_hs.pdf

Engineering Design Notebook PowerPoint – Project Lead The Way

http://westcampus.scusd.edu/sites/main/files/file-attachments/engineeringnotebook.pdf

Video on Engineers Notebook –  Michael Schlueter

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XNsO71ivqM8  (14 minutes)

U.S. Department of Energy – Science Education and Resources

http://www.energy.gov/science-innovation/science-education

National Renewable Energy Laboratory  (NREL) – Renewable Energy Science Projects

http://www.nrel.gov/education/pdfs/educational_resources/high_school/re_ee_projects.pdf

PBS’ Nova Lab - Energy Lab Guide for Educators

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/labs/educators/energy-guide/

COMPETITION TIMELINE

Online Registration and Phase 1 Project Submission Opens September 24, 2015
Deadline for Registering and Completing Phase 1 Project Submissions October, 23, 2015
Phase 1 Judging   October 26-30, 2015
Top 5 Projects – Phase 1 Notified November 3, 2015
Top 5 Projects Attend and Present their Projects at National Conference November 19-21, 2015
Funds for Phase 2 Distributed to Top 5 Project Winners  December 15, 2015
Phase 2 - Final Designs, Documents, and Videos Uploaded Online February 1-12, 2016
Initial Judging – Phase 2 February 15-19, 2016
Revision Period February 22-26, 2016
Final Judging of Phase 2 Final Submissions Feb. 29 - March 4, 2016
Grand award Winner Notified/Announced March 7, 2016
Grand Award Winner Presents Winning Project in Washington, DC April 4-8, 2016

 

Questions

You may call Melanee Stevens, Program Coordinator, at (720) 552-6123 or email her at mstevens@aises.org.

About Our Partner, the DEMD

The Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development (IEED), Division of Energy and Mineral Development (DEMD) office is the primary office responsible for fulfilling BIA’s trust responsibility to Indian Tribes and allottees concerning the development of their conventional energy, renewable energy and mineral resources on Trust lands.  DEMD is the only office within the Federal government with the primary responsibility of assisting Indian mineral owners assess, identify, and promote their energy and mineral resources and insuring that the Indian communities and individual Indians realize a maximum revenue stream from the development of their vast Trust resources.  While other DOI agencies have some limited responsibilities in Indian energy and mineral development, the Tribe (or allottee) is not their main client as it is with DEMD.   DEMD takes a much stronger role as the lead agency providing advice and financial support to Indians.  

The development of energy resources on Indian lands has helped to place the United States on the path to a more secure energy future, while significantly impacting the economic health of many Indian communities.  While the progress has been substantial there remains much to do, as historically Indian lands still remain under-developed relative to surrounding non-Indian lands.  Recognizing the opportunities that exist for Indians, DEMD’s sole purpose is to provide technical advice, economic advice and support services to assist Tribes in achieving the maximum economic self-sufficiency by creating sustainable economic benefit through the environmentally sound development of their energy and mineral resources.  One portion of this effort is to develop tribal managerial, organization and technical capacity needed to maximize the economic impact of energy resource development on Indian land.

Visit the DEMD online at:  http://www.bia.gov/WhoWeAre/AS-IA/IEED/DEMD/

National American Indian Virtual Science and Engineering Fair

AISES is hosting its third virtual science and engineering fair this spring!  The National American Indian Virtual Science and Engineering Fair (NAIVSEF) is a Society for Science and the Public (SSP) affiliated science fair and as such is part of the larger SSP fair network. The NAIVSEF differs from other SSP-affiliated fairs in that it is a “Virtual Science Fair”. Unlike live fairs, virtual fairs do not require travel as the fair and judging are conducted online and via teleconference calls. 

AISES awards cash prizes to senior and junior division winners and also pays the travel and registration fees for the Senior Division Grand Award winners and their sponsors to attend the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (this year being held in Phoenix, Arizona, May 8–13, 2016).

For more information on the 2016 NAIVSEF visit: http://www.aises.org/events/naivsef

2015 National American Indian Virtual Science and Engineering Fair

The Virtual Science and Engineering Fair was such a success, it was rewarded by the Society for Science and the Public and for the Intel ISEF 2015--specifically on the projects from the fair and any interaction that they had with the SRC. Acknowledgement was made of the excellent job in adhering to the International Rules and in providing the proper documentation in the initial submission of the project paperwork.

The 2015 winners were:

Grand Award Winners (all-expense paid trip to Intel ISEF in Pittsburg, PA):

1stPlace: Gabe Lah, Ojibwe, Cloquet, MN ​ and Evan Pokornowski Ojibwe, Cloquet, MN

Check out Gabe and Evan's project- video link & slideshow link

2nd Place: McKalee Steen, Cherokee, Grove, OK​

Check out McKalee's project- video link & slideshow link

3rd Place: Aisha Cacique, Grand Portage, Minneapolis, MN​

Check out Aisha's project- video link & slideshow link

Runner-up: Grant Two Bulls, Oglala Sioux Tribe, Minneapolis, MN

Check out Grant's project- video link & slideshow link

Senior Division- Life Sciences Class:

1st Place: McKalee Steen, Grove High School, Grade 12,  Cherokee, Grove, OK

2nd Place: Aisha Cacique, Nawayee Center School, Grade 12, Grand Portage, Minneapolis, MN

3rd Place: Grant Two Bulls, Breck School, Grade 12, Oglala Sioux Tribe, Minneapolis, MN

Senior Division- Math & Engineering Class:

1st Place: Gabe Lah and Evan Pokornowski, Cloquet Senior High School, Grade 10, Ojibwe, Cloquet, MN

2nd Place: Hayden Randall, Taos High School, Grade 11, Kiowa, Taos, NM

3rd Place: Kelly Charley, Navajo Preparatory School, Grade 10,Navajo, Teec Nos Pos, AZ

Special Award Winners:

Galaitsis Family Special Award – Senior Division:  Gabe Lah and Evan Pokornowski, Ojibwe, Cloquet, MN

NAIVSEF Junior Division 2015 Winners

1st Place:  Randa Shaw, The Villages Charter School, Grade 8, Choctaw, Bushnell, FL

2nd Place: Noel Redding, Cloquet Middle School, Grade 7, Fond du Lac Band of Ojibwe and Gabby Laubach, Cloquet, MN

3rd Place:  Isabella Roy, Cloquet Middle School, Grade 7, Fond du Lac Ojibwe, Cloquet, MN

Special Award Winner:

Galaitsis Family Special Award – Junior Division:  Randa Shaw, Choctaw, Bushnell, FL

Power-Up Workshops 

What’s a Power Up Workshop?

Power Up workshops are designed to boost student engagement in science fairs and to improve the quality and quantity of science fair research and projects entered at the local, national, and international level. At these workshops, students, and educators can gain new knowledge to bring back to their community, learn about new ways to conduct scientific research, and participate in quality programs that are designed to drive student success in STEM.  The curriculum utilizes a 28-page Power Up workbook developed by AISES.  Workshops are interactive, follow the workbook, and utilize audio-visual aids, such as slideshows, flipcharts and small group activities. 

The target audience, for these ½ day workshops, is middle and high school students (grades 5 through 12) and their educators.  Attendance at Power Up Workshops typically consists of educators, parents, and students and can range from 25 to 100 plus individuals, depending upon the community size, number of schools in the region, venue size, and general interest. 

These workshops are a great way to introduce your students to science fairs and to learn what it takes as an educator to get your students ready to participate in local and regional science fairs, or even, the NAIVSEF!  National American Indian Virtual Science and Engineering Fair info can be found online at: http://www.aises.org/programs/pre-college.  Unlike other fairs, your students do not have to travel to participate in the NAIVSEF!

History

In 2010, AISES staff and a select group of educators and subject matter experts were able to produce the first POWER UP Science Fair Manual and educational workshop that focused on the scientific method, effective project presentations, proper research techniques and information on how to complete the complicated paperwork that is required to produce successful science fair projects.

AISES has presented the manual to four out of its seven regions with thrilling success. More than 150 students and 50 teachers, representing over 25 tribal nations and communities have attended these workshops. Over 85% of the students reported that the POWER UP Science Fair Manual and workshop was helpful. In addition, students reported that they plan to utilize what they had learned for the creation of their own science fair projects at the AISES National American Indian Science and Engineering Fair in addition to other community or state science fairs. (Currently, the AISES fair is now offered as a virtual fair, but there are plenty of “live” fairs throughout the country for high schoolers and middle schoolers!)

Host a Power Up Workshop This Spring!

We’ll come to your community!  AISES has funding from a number of generous sponsors to provide Power Up Workshops across the country.  We anticipate conducting up to 8 workshops this winter/spring 2015.  Interested schools and community organizations need to contact AISES (info provided below) to start the process.  Funders for this year’s Power Up workshops include the United States Department of Energy, Toyota USA Foundation, and Motorola Foundation.

What’s required to Host?

We try to make it as easy and cost-free as possible.  First, host communities/schools need to have or serve a significant Native American/Native Alaskan student population.  Schools or organizations can be on- or off-reservation communities, urban or rural.  All you need to do is be willing to provide a venue large enough for the anticipated students and/or educators with appropriate seating (e.g. classroom, school auditorium, community building, etc.) and help us get the word out.

AISES will provide the rest of the programming at no cost (manuals, presentation materials, presenter).  The workshops can be held during teacher in-service days at schools, in the evening, afterschool, during school, or on a weekend day.  The session could even be presented as part of another event you are already offering!

Process:  Basically the process is: 

  1. AISES contacts communities that respond to this article.
  2. AISES and community work to find and secure a suitable space for the workshop.
  3. Dates are selected.
  4. Logistics are arranged.
  5. AISES and the community promote the workshop event.
  6. Workshop is held and brief (we mean brief) evaluations collected.
  7. Evaluations are analyzed (we do this).

How do I start the process?

If you are an authorized individual from a school or community, please send an email to Kathy DeerInWater, Director of Strategic Initiatives & Research at kdeerinwater@aises.org​, indicating your interest, number and types of potential attendees you expect to have in attendance, your community location, possible sites for holding the event, and some desirable dates. 

AISES’ New VEX Robotics Program Launches - Assistance Now Available!

Want to get your students engaged in STEM?  In robotics?  Here’s your chance!  AISES is launching a pilot program designed to bring VEX Robotics to Native schools and communities this fall and spring.   In fact, we are kicking off this new program at our 2015 National Conference in Phoenix, AZ, this November 19-21, 2015. 

If you are attending the National Conference, please check out the VEX Robotics Demonstrations on Thursday (pre-registration required) at the Stem Day Activities and/or the Robotics Education & Competition Foundation, Booth 517, on Friday at the Career and opportunities Fair. 

Why Robotics?

Instilling in Native American youth the love of learning about STEM fields helps put them on a path toward academic achievement, degree attainment and ability to contribute productively to their communities. Carnegie Mellon Robotics Academy says that robotics is the single best integrator of science, technology, engineering and math. Learning to work in the field of robotics at a young age can help to spur Native youth toward achievements in STEM and securing a secondary (and higher education) degree. Plus, working with robots has a way of circumventing the math anxiety that some children have learned.

Native American students participating in and preparing for a robotics competition learn critical thinking, problem solving, creativity, collaboration and teamwork. Student teams build their own robot, program it, test it, adjust it, and design and build extra components such as delivery systems. Teachers serve as resources and coaches, but the youth do the work of creating a unique robot they hope will be the best of its kind.

Students with vast potential that cannot be sufficiently tapped by classroom work need modes of learning that lie outside of the classroom, that hitch hands, minds and spirit of competition to making something real and trying to make it the best its kind. For these students, robotics can be the inspiration they need, linking academic theory to a fun, real-world project. The robotics theme keeps these “academic athletes” focused all year on learning the lessons necessary to be competitive.

In addition, teachers learn how to teach and coach robotics-relevant subjects. They will be linked to and participate in educational resources that are new to them and to experienced coaches (through RECF and/or AISES’ chapter members who are Native American professionals in STEM) who will facilitate their integration of new materials in their classroom.                  

With generous funding and support from GM Foundation, Northrop Grumman, Motorola Solutions Foundation, and the Siletz Tribal Charitable Contribution Fund, AISES will be able to provide assistance to schools and community organizations interested in starting up new Robotics programming for their youth. 

If you are interested in bringing robotics to your school, please contact Kathy DeerInWater, Director of Strategic Initiatives & Research at kdeerinwater@aises.org​ or by calling 720.552.6123.   Support available includes financial assistance with teacher training, teacher stipends, technical assistance, and equipment assistance, with a funding maximum of $6,500 per school.  While this is a national program, we do have funds earmarked for an Oregon school team; schools from other states are encouraged to apply.

Science Bowl 

AISES has received support for a regional science bowl, which will also allow us to capitalize on and draw from the amazing strength and leadership AISES enjoys with its professional chapters. Known now as the SUN Project and made possible by the Department of Energy, AISES will be conducting outreach to urban Native students in STEM. With the support of our Professional Chapters and other partners, the SUN Project will coach and support three middle school science teams to compete in the local competitions in these areas.

The Science Bowl is an academic competition that tests students’ knowledge in all areas of math and science. Students will be quizzed in a fast paced question-and-answer format similar to that of a popular TV quiz show.  Competing teams will be composed of four to five students and a teacher who serves as an advisor and coach.

Where and When are Regional Science Bowls Held? Regionals run from February to late March as the National Science Bowl which they feed into is held April 30-May 4, 2015.  NOTE:  Registration deadlines and competition dates vary from state to state, and some states have more than one regional competition.  Also, regional science bowls in one state may also serve neighboring states that do not have their own science bowl.  You can check out the registration deadlines and competition dates deadlines for your state here.  

What’s Expected?  The Professional Chapter will identify and recruit teams from schools serving Native American youth in their region.  There may be more than one team from a particular school.  The goal is 3 teams of four students plus one alternate per region.  Teams must be middle school students and must have at least one Native American member each.  Teams must be formed in compliance with NSB Regulations.  Team members must be from the same school and in grades 6-8 (see regulations for age requirements and other specifics). 

Coaches will be chapter members who meet with students and their teacher(s) at their school one to two times per week for 60 to 90 minutes to explain what a science bowl is and the rules and to prepare teams for competition.  Coaching Resources such as sample questions, strategies for success, and rules can be found online.  

Science Bowl Subjects:  Biology and Chemistry, Math and Physics, Earth and Space Science, and Energy and General Science.

Financial Assistance:  Each Professional Chapter will receive financial assistance to help it sponsor and coach three (3) middle school science bowl teams).  Financial assistance will total $6,400.00 for each of the two chapters that are to be selected.  The suggested budget per chapter:

  • $300: for event registration for 3 teams per region, $100 per team
  • $5,025: per region to cover costs associated with coaching all teams (space, refreshments, mileage reimbursements for coaches, t-shirts for students, etc.)
  • $75: AISES memberships for 15 students
  • $1,000: travel assistance to enable the teams per region to attend regional science bowl

Interested?  Interested Professional Chapters may contact Kathy DeerInWater, Director of Strategic Initiatives & Research at kdeerinwater@aises.org or by calling 720.552.6123.

Interested schools/teachers should reach out to the AISES Professional Chapter in their region and encourage them to participate in the SUN Projector contact Kathy DeerInWater (see above).  Professional Chapters and their contact info can be found here.  Chapters are located in the following states:  Alaska, Arizona, California, New Mexico, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, South Dakota, Washington, Washington, DC., Wisconsin, and Wyoming. 

Application Deadline:  February 15 or sooner (depends on your regional science bowl calendar)!  

AISES National Conference 

Held annually since 1978, the AISES National Conference is a one-of-a-kind, three-day event convening high school juniors and seniors, college and graduate students, teachers, workforce professionals, corporate partners, and all members of the “AISES family.”  The AISES National conference has become the premier event for Native American Science, Engineering & Math (STEM) professionals and students attracting over 1,600 attendees form across the country

The AISES 2016 National Conference will be in Minneapolis, MN, November 10th-12th, 2016. For the latest information on the AISES National Conference click here.  To ensure you receive notification updates about the 2014 National Conference, please be sure you sign-up for informational updates and our monthly newsletter. 

Here are nine reasons why this is a “must-do” event.

  1. Networking. Offering cutting-edge thought on important current STEM issues, excellent career resources, and traditional cultural activities, the AISES National Conference is unlike any other STEM conference you’ll attend.
  2. Community. With 1,800 participants in 2010, there is something of a "reunion" quality to the AISES National Conference, where even newcomers feel they are coming into a "family" setting, and where our deep-seated commitment to personal relationships can be bolstered.
  3. Deeper Discovery. The conference provides thought-provoking and illuminating learning through concurrent sessions and special professional development workshops.
  4. Employment.   AISES' National Conference offers the largest career fair in Indian Country, with many companies and agencies hiring on the spot, and others looking to identify talent for future recruitment.
  5. Educational Resources. In addition to the professional development tracks and workshops, AISES’ National Conference opportunities to showcase academic research and study as well as connections to graduate, internship, fellowship and career opportunity.
  6. Indigenous and Elder Wisdom. Offering blessings, insights, and wisdom throughout the event, AISES’ National Conference offers a unique perspective on ways tradition and STEM can be effectively bridged in the 21st century. Our Council of Elders helps remind us where we come from and what we need to hold onto in order to live a life that is not just meaningful, but full of meaning.
  7. Welcoming Atmosphere. The AISES conference offers a sense of community and "family" that can sustain your spirit as many of us venture far from our communities to navigate our educational and career paths.
  8. Real-Time. Nothing beats the face-to-face value of conference attendance, not only for networking and mentoring, but also when it comes to the fun and affirmation of the social events, awards ceremonies, and traditional events such as the Powwow.
  9. Nice Price. Take a look at other conference registration fees and you'll find that AISES' National Conference is a good deal.
  10. Inspiration. The presence of so many young Natives, educators, and professionals gathered for good purpose is uplifting, sustaining, and joyous.

AISES Regional Conferences 

AISES’ Regional Conferences take place every spring and provide an opportunity for AISES College and Professional Chapters to gather and share information, form partnerships, and to network with each other and with selected presenters and partners.

Each regional conference has a number of informative sessions and activities for both college and high school students. Among the activities provided are mini career fairs, poster presentations, and engineering competitions. AISES’ student representatives and the host chapters for the following year are selected at the regional conferences.

Local and national professionals within a variety of fields provide workshops, seminars, and discussion groups about a wide variety of topics. Generally, each Regional Conference host develops a theme or focus area for the Regional Conference (environmental, bridging native cultures with science, etc.).

The host chapter for the following spring’s regional conference is determined during the Regional Conference held each spring.

Chapters interested in hosting the regional conference indicate their interest in hosting and make a verbal presentation regarding their resources, planning, and ability to host the conference. Each college chapter in "Good Standing" is allowed one vote; the majority of votes determines the location of the regional conference.  

Now taking applications for 2017 Regional Conference Host Sites.  

Applications are due 30 days prior to the 2016 Regional Conference

Visit the events section to find upcoming Regional Conferences near you. 

2016 Conference Schedule:

Region 1- Virtual Conference- Dates: TBD

Region 2- Cal Poly Pomona, Pomona, CA- Dates: March 18-19, 2016

Region 3- Navajo Prep, Farmington, NM- Dates: March 18-19, 2016

Region 4- University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK- Dates: March 4, 2016

​Region 5- University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND- Dates: March 4-5, 2016

Region 6- McGill University, Montreal, Quebec- Dates:February 19-21, 2016

Region 7- University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN- Dates: TBD

Scholarships  

AISES offers a universe of opportunities to students! Our students choose to move fiercely forward in their educational journeys by learning and acquiring new skills that will help them in meeting the ever-changing STEM needs of our communities.

At AISES, we invest more than just scholarship support into our students; we are investing confidence, trust and a large community of support and encouragement for our students. Year after year, our AISES scholars bring potential and limitless possibilities for the future of STEM, each working towards advancing his or her opportunities in STEM career fields.

Among our current and past scholarship programs, sponsors have included Google, Intel, Burlington Northern Santa Fe, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and many others. Information for scholarships for the 2014-2015 academic year will be available soon.  View our current scholarships.

Internships 

The AISES Internship Program provides students with applied work experience and an opportunity to explore career options. Placing students in 10-week summer positions with partner agencies, the program also promotes advanced study to the graduate level and assists students in developing professional networks. Interns are provided with round-trip airfare or mileage to internship site, a weekly stipend, dormitory lodging and a local transportation allowance.

In 2013, internship opportunities included: ASRC Federal Holding Company, USDA FSIS (Food Safety and Inspection Service), Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Census, U.S. EPA (Environmental Protection Agency), and U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

View our current internships.